Jesuit

Adolfo Nicolás was born in Villamuriel de Cerrato, Palencia, Spain, on 29 April 1936 and entered the Jesuit novitiate of Aranjuez in 1953. He studied at the University of Alcalá, where he earned his licentiate in philosophy. In 1960, he was assigned to Japan where he studied theology at Sophia University in Tokyo. He was ordained to the priesthood on 17 March 1967.From 1968 to 1971, Fr Nicolás studied at the Pontifical Gregorian University in Rome, from where he earned a doctorate in theology....
I’m Paul Nicholson, and I’ve just completed an eight-year appointment as Director of Novices for the four Jesuit Provinces of North-West Europe (Britain, Ireland, Flanders and the Netherlands).I joined the Society in 1978, having been a pupil at the Jesuit school in Wimbledon, and then studied zoology at Durham University. I can remember as a teenager looking at one or two of the Jesuit teachers I knew, and thinking “I’d like to be like him.” Apart from anything...
My name is Michael Kirwan, I was born in 1959 in Leeds, of Irish parents. I first met the Jesuits at St Michaels College, a school run by the Jesuits in Leeds for about a hundred years. I was impressed by the variety of the Jesuit priests whom I met- they were not many, but there seemed to be no ‘standard’ pattern, and yet they worked well together. I was especially struck by the Jesuits’ respect for intellectual and academic work, and for the world of culture.It was only...
I took first vows as a Jesuit brother in September 2012 after a two year novitiate. I feel called to commit my life to finding out where God is sending me to serve the Kingdom of God in the Society of Jesus. At the moment that mostly takes the form of studying philosophy and theology at Heythrop College. I take part in some of the college chaplaincy events and was part of a new initiative in my community to grow vegetables in our garden.For several years I had the feeling that I did not want to...
The Jesuits I first encountered in books worked in seemingly neglected fields of the Church’s life.  From the twentieth century, they were the French Jesuit palaeontologist, Teilhard de Chardin who also reflected on how his scientific understanding was woven into his faith and his experience of God; Cardinal  Augustin Bea helped Pope John XXIII develop the Church’s ecumenical dialogue to renew our friendship with Christians separated from the Catholic Church; Rutilio Grande, ...
I was born and grew up in the South East of England. After leaving university, I joined the Jesuits at the age of 23 and it took me nine years of training to be ordained a priest in Brixton Hill in 1999, a moment which has always seemed like the turning-point of my life.I have done a variety of different jobs since then: I worked as a curate in a vibrant parish, learning from more experienced priests and the People of God themselves what priesthood means. I spent some years working in an...
My background is not really typical.  I was an infantry officer in the British Army for eight years, and if someone had told me when I went to Sandhurst that one day I would be a Jesuit priest I would have laughed at the absurdity of the idea.  If you want to make God laugh, tell him your plans … I then left the Army, went to Durham to read psychology, and then went on to Newcastle University to train as a clinical psychologist.  I worked in the NHS for six years in adult...
The French philosopher, palaeontologist and geologist, Fr Pierre Teilhard de Chardin SJ is the focus for the Society of Jesus this January, as he features in the commemorative calendar produced by the Jesuits in Britain. The calendar was this week launched in an online version, in several languages and with more detailed essays about each of the 12 featured Jesuits than could be offered in the printed version. The Jesuits in Britain issued their 2014 calendar as the Society of Jesus...
Pope Francis saying mass at the Gésu in Rome
The white smoke appeared surprisingly early.  The Jesuit community in Edinburgh gathered round the TV to hear the announcement.  We had enough Latin to understand great joy and wondered how it fitted with the first name George. When the unfamiliar surname Bergoglio was spoken, someone in the group said, he is one of us. Most Jesuits I know were shocked. This might seem strange, but we have always taken it for granted that there would never be a Jesuit Pope. The founder of the Jesuits...

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