Jesuit

I am Fr Peter Griffiths and I have been a Jesuit for nearly fifty four years and a priest for nearly forty years. After my ordination, I taught Maths and Science in Wimbledon College for seven years. Then I worked as a parish priest beginning in Boscombe, near Bournemouth where I stayed for five years. Then to the parish at Stamford Hill after that, and then I had a break as Superior of Farm Street with special responsibility for elderly Jesuits. After that, I went to Glasgow and worked as...
Thomas Stephens was born in Wiltshire around 1550, becoming a Catholic after studies in Oxford.  He travelled to Rome and became a Jesuit in 1575.  He was missioned to Goa in Portuguese India by Fr General Everard Mercurian where he arrived in 1579, possibly the first Englishman to set foot in India.  He served as parish priest and Superior in Salcete, Goa until his death in 1619.  He is best remembered for his linguistic and literary scholarship.  Known as the Father...
St John Ogilvie was born in Scotland in 1579, the son of Sir Walter Ogilvie of Drum-na-Keith, Banffshire, and raised a Calvinist. He was sent abroad to further his education and was converted to the Catholic faith.   He entered the Jesuit novitiate in Vienna in 1599 and was ordained in Paris in 1610. After a spell teaching in Rouen, he was allowed to return as a missionary to Scotland where he arrived disguised as a horse dealer in 1613.   Within a year he was betrayed...
Gerard Manley Hopkins was born on 28 July 1844 in East London. He attended Cholmeley Grammar School, Highgate, showing a gift for art, literature and music from his early years.  While a student at Balliol College, Oxford, he was received into the Catholic Church by John Henry Newman. He entered the Jesuit novitiate at Roehampton in September 1868. Ordained in 1877, he became a teacher at Mount St Mary’s, Chesterfield.  His work as a minister and teacher took him to London,...
I am Fr Michael Beattie and I have been a member of the British Province of the Society of Jesus for almost sixty years.Most of my active life has been spent as the parish priest, in charge of St George’s Worcester, The Sacred Heart Wimbledon, Farm Street Church, The Sacred Heart  Edinburgh and Corpus Christi Boscombe, Bournemouth. For 27 years I was very active as the National Secretary of the Apostleship of Prayer which occupation took me into parishes  the length and breadth of the...
Before joining the Jesuits I read English Language and Literature at the University of Leeds. There I became involved with the Catholic Chaplaincy where my Faith was nourished by retreats, visits to Taizé and the Student Cross pilgrimage to Walsingham.After university I gave up the opportunity for further study to make a greater commitment to the Gospel. I worked for several years as a full time volunteer, first with the homeless in Glasgow and later with adults with learning disabilities in...
Henry Garnet was born in 1555 in Derbyshire. He travelled to Rome to become a Jesuit in 1575 and after studying and teaching for 11 years, returned as a missionary to England in 1586,a period of extreme danger for Catholics.  Garnet’s brethren were regularly betrayed and arrested, tortured and executed.  Victims included Robert Southwell, with whom Garnet had travelled to England, and William Weston, the only other Jesuit in England at the time of his return.  Garnet thus...
One of the forty English martyr saints, Robert Southwell is widely known for his poetry. Born around 1561 at Horsham St Faith and brought up in a family of Norfolk gentry, he boarded at the English College at Douai but studied at the associated French Jesuit College of Anchin. When applying for entrance into the Society in Rome, he was only admitted after having written a heartfelt appeal against a first refusal.  He eventually joined in 1580. After ordination in 1584 he served as prefect...
Aged 23, John Gerard became a Jesuit in Rome in August 1588. Having already studied at the Jesuit College in Clermont, he was sent almost immediately back to England. For six years he undertook a clandestine mission, bringing more than twenty influential families back to the Catholic faith and preaching the Spiritual Exercises. He worked closely with the Jesuit superior in England, Henry Garnet. He was captured in 1594 and sent to the Tower of London where he was tortured, fruitlessly, to...
 WordExplanationAMDGAd Maiorem Dei Gloriam – Latin meaning “for the greater glory of God” – the Jesuit motto.  Often put at the beginning of documents or correspondence.BrotherJesuits who are not and do not expect to become priests.CommunityGroup of Jesuits who form a unit with a superior, usually living together in one residence.ConsolationA feeling described by St Ignatius as “Every increase in hope, faith and charity and every interior joy which calls...

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